Sign In | Create an Account | Welcome, . My Account | Logout | Subscribe | Submit News | Extras | All Access e-Edition | Home RSS
 
 
 

Remembering Gus

January 4, 2013

Those of us fortunate enough to have been blessed with the happenstance of living in a dog-controlled home know only too well the deep attachment that can form between human and canine....

« Back to Article

 
 
sort: oldest | newest

Comments

(3)

Regelski

Mar-12-13 1:47 PM

Every dog I've had died what, in human terms, would be an awful death: cancer, heart disease, injury from cars or hunters. Usually they need to be 'put down' but only after we acknowledge their suffering and pain and get over our attachment, our selfishness, to keeping them alive. Dogs (and cats and other pets) need our 'love' when they most need it: at the end. They will love us and we will love them until the final moment, then we must let them go--from their pain and confusion about what they recognize is wrong with them. "Stupid" animals, by civilized standards need intelligent and thoughtful carers. Then, on the other hand we might expect the same with regard to people who suffer. Another argument.

0 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

Regelski

Mar-12-13 1:40 PM

Touching and well written and deeply felt. Many readers, I suppose, are like me, whose age (and I'm old) are defined by an era of this of that dog, each to meet their end, which is almost always unfortunate in its circumstances. I admire those who make their dogs 'members of the family', rather than tie them out in the cold. I especially admire those who rescue dogs from shelters or abandonment. Among my favorites have been those rescued from the dog count Anyone who knows about dogs know that the likelihood of finding a good 'buddy' is greater from the pound than from the breeder. Too many in-bread problems afflict the latter. Yet. for the first time in my life, I have a Golden Lab and and a Golden Retriever, and I (and they?) have lucked out. Either way, if you take in a dog, learn to let it love you and you'll love it. I can't abide by seeing dogs left in the cold, fed daily, but unloved. Dogs have a history with humans (or vice versa) that is worth celebrating. (cont.)

0 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

Regelski

Mar-12-13 1:40 PM

Touching and well written and deeply felt. Many readers, I suppose, are like me, whose age (and I'm old) are defined by an era of this of that dog, each to meet their end, which is almost always unfortunate in its circumstances. I admire those who make their dogs 'members of the family', rather than tie them out in the cold. I especially admire those who rescue dogs from shelters or abandonment. Among my favorites have been those rescued from the dog count Anyone who knows about dogs know that the likelihood of finding a good 'buddy' is greater from the pound than from the breeder. Too many in-bread problems afflict the latter. Yet. for the first time in my life, I have a Golden Lab and and a Golden Retriever, and I (and they?) have lucked out. Either way, if you take in a dog, learn to let it love you and you'll love it. I can't abide by seeing dogs left in the cold, fed daily, but unloved. Dogs have a history with humans (or vice versa) that is worth celebrating. (cont.)

0 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

Showing 3 of 3 comments
 
 

Post a Comment

You must first login before you can comment.

*Your email address:
*Password:
Remember my email address.
or
 
 

 

I am looking for:
in:
News, Blogs & Events Web