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Many area teachers ‘dedicated’

March 3, 2013

I have read numerous blogs and editorials that have been critical of the teaching profession. I feel a need to respond based on my own experience and that of many dedicated colleagues....

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(16)

eagleswings

Mar-03-13 2:15 AM

This article is the norm rather than the exception. Further most people don't bother to consider the amount of debt accumulated by those wishing to become teachers since it requires 6 yrs of education to become fully certified in NY state. The hours are long because in addition to the workload of the classroom and lesson planning, there is an ever increasing load of extra paperwork required by the state.

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Christopher

Mar-03-13 7:19 AM

The issue with teachers really isn't teachers, it's school taxes. School taxes are the biggest and fastest rising of all local taxes and the only ones subject to some sort of vote. Therefore, teachers are the easy targets. Let's face it, ALL so-called public employees are targets these days. The real issues can't be addressed, so the frustration boils over. I'm sure there's a teacher or 2 that could be replaced, but the majority of them do the best they can with what they're given. They are NOT overpaid for their education required.

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judeye

Mar-03-13 9:34 AM

As the saying goes...if you think education is expensive...try ignorance.

Thank YOU to all teachers who give so much to our children. Our children are our future.

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HaveANiceDay

Mar-03-13 3:44 PM

I've never understood teacher bashing. I don't know of any other profession that directly aides the development of future Doctors, Lawyers, CEO's, Engineers, Nurses, etc... One does not attain these lofty professions with out the help of their teachers from age 5 to age 18. Thank you teachers. Without your help I would not be the productive, tax paying member of society I am today. Keep fighting the good fight and ignore the ignorant trying to break you down. If they only knew......

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MikeDavis

Mar-05-13 9:12 PM

State Starting Salary Average Salary 10-year increase Salary Comfort Index California $56,950 $67,871 29.3 14 Rhode Island $56,680 $60,923 25.7 21 New Jersey $54,580 $66,612 28.6 22 Alaska $51,950 $62,918 30.7 43 Massachusetts $50,880 $70,752 45.4 6 Maryland $50,680 $63,960 39.2 27 Connecticut $49,700 $69,165 31.3 1 New York $48,520 $72,708 41.2 34

#8 in the country for starting salary. 41.2 per cent raises in the last ten years. I am working for 12% more than I was ten years ago. I don't feel to sorry for teachers. Every one of them new exactly what they were signing up for as they worked towards the degree to be a teacher. I have had some great teachers that I respect and love to this day. But not all are there because they felt the calling of teaching. They are there for the safety of the municipal check.

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Regelski

Mar-08-13 11:01 AM

So Mike, its all about money, not the return on it? You claim to have had teachers you loved, but I suspect that you didn't pay enough attention to them. If you had, you'd be in a better economic place. Teaching is one of the "helping professions" like the ministry, therapy law and medicine. Teachers exist to help others and our nation; compared to the other helping professions they earn only a modest amount, compared to their value to the US. You are an angry person; that much is clear. I wish you'd reflect on your anger, and especially how and where you exhibit it. There's a lot to be said about improving schooling, but dumping on teachers is not the way. BTW, do you belong to a union? Wish you did? Or just hate public service unions? Does that include the police? Welfare workers and others who care for us, often at inconvenience to themselves. I wonder what your children were/are like in school? Are they thriving? Or are they continuing the angry pattern of your

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MikeDavis

Mar-09-13 2:51 PM

Tom, I'm not even going into the diatribe I could offer for the public education system. Mad? You dammed right I am. American taxpayers are being asked to cough up more and more for a sinking system. The quality of education is abysmal. Ask basic questions of high school graduates and the answers are used for comedy routines they are so ridiculous. And you defend that? The system is and has been broken for a long time. The three R's aren't important anymore. Now it's the "little darlings" self esteem that needs to be nurtured. They are there to learn, not be indoctrinated into a belief system. That the academic world is biased to the left is well documented. The whole country is feeling the effects of the social engineering going on. It's the natural progression of freedom to slavery when the masses realize they can vote themselves anything they want simply because they are the majority.

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MikeDavis

Mar-09-13 3:05 PM

And in a capitalistic society Tom? Yes!!...Yes it is all about the money. Are you educating them to dig ditches for minimum wage? Or to get a lucrative career for the rest of their lives? The poor are whining the rich aren't paying enough...that isn't about the money? The government wants to raise the debt ceiling yet again....that isn't about the money? The whole way of life in America has and, for a little while longer at least, will be about the money. When is the last time you went into the administration of the university and said, please I am making to much, take some back? Or have you volunteered to give up your pension, because it's just to much and you don't want to be "about the money"? The only other "currency" in America now is political power. And the players are working overtime to get more and more of that also.

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Regelski

Mar-10-13 1:47 PM

Mike: I guess you had an unhappy time at school. In what other profession do the 'clients' (or their parents) think they know more than the professionals? What is your expertise regarding teaching, curriculum, etc.? Or this part of your anti-social blathe; in this case, picking on teachers? I agree, entirely, that there are monumental problems with American education, but I don't lay this at the door of teachers alone(or their unions, which I think is the source of your anger)--at least not entirely. We've all had teachers who 'go through the motions' but we've also had those whose altruism for students goes beyond the call of 'duty'. You always manage to insult those who don't agree but how successful were you in school? Do you resent some aspect of schooling that you credit with your present standing in life? Why should I or anyone pay attention? As said, there is much to criticize in American education. But lambasting teachers is not the way to deal with it. (cont).

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Regelski

Mar-10-13 1:57 PM

(cont.) International comparison tests rank American students well below the average in the world. Some of this is the result of American pluralism, in comparison to counties that are monocultural. Still, those countries that have educational pre-school programs (not just baby-sitting) are at the top of international scores. This doesn't deter the right-wing (GOP and Tea Kettlers) from immediately opposing Obama's initiative to make America more competitive in a world where we're losing ground. Add to that, the craze for high-stakes testing and the reliance on that for teacher's jobs is crazy. First, because high stakes testing reveals nothing (witness the US poor performance on international tests). Secondly, because it applies an industrial/capitalist model on American education, already beset with a "factory model" of producing widgets on a production line, not effectively educating functional citizens. What is your own educational history? What entitles you to any e

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MikeDavis

Mar-11-13 12:34 PM

Wow, Tom I think I struck a nerve. I had a great time in school. Graduated at 17 from high school. While I attended college I made the Dean's list every semester and greatly enjoyed that experience also. I make a very nice living at what I do. I also enjoy a wonderful life visiting my children and grandchildren with the amount of time I can afford to take off at my income level. Your supposition that I am struggling or bitter is so far off I can't begin to figure where you got that idea. But whatever. As far as pre-school programs. Great, who pays for that? The primary education system is (supposedly)underfunded. Do we just go a little farther into the red to pay for that program? And the poor performance on tests is a reflection of the quality of the education the children are getting. How else do you measure that? By their self-esteem? I don't get judged by my feelings at work Tom, I get judged by my performance and abilities. It's called real life...

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Regelski

Mar-12-13 12:19 PM

Mike: I too, graduated at 17, near the middle of my class. Then a short stint trying to be a professional baseball player (pitcher, Richmond AAA). The bus leagues at the time were gruesome. So college awaited me. I also was a ****Laude grad, and went on to a career as a scholar and author. I can only wonder why and how, in your education, you never learned to have civil conversations about things you don't agree with. Why the need for the constant insults? Why the demeaning, in this case, of schooling? The facts are clear, pre-school, done as more than baby-sitting, raises scores on the PISA exams. End of discussion!. Who pays? We all do, but not as you imagine: we all pay for the waste of the talent of American students compared to the rest of the world. Read the stats? Where do we fall, for example, in health car and education? LOWer than the international average. As you satisfied as an American with that? Or only concerned with your next school tax bill?

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MikeDavis

Mar-12-13 1:12 PM

There are studies proving that pre-schools do nothing of the sort also, Tom. So please don't cite a liberal biased study that was done by a "leading university". What do think they would say, that it didn't make a difference? That would be shooting themselves in the foot. The problem still remains who pays for all these social programs? Do we just keep printing for money until it's worthless and the world economies crash? And the quality of education is still abysmal. As I have said before the question/answer sessions of basic knowledge for high school graduates are being used in comedy routines because their answers are so stupid as to be something to laugh at. At the cost the education system is spiraling up to I want a better return on what is already being invested.

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Regelski

Mar-12-13 3:05 PM

Mike: The data are conflicted. Pre-school, in the US (!) has a mixed record. On of the the factors is what happens to students who have benefited from their "head start" but face the usual usual effects of schooling in America. To the point, check the OECD-PISA data and those countries that have bona fide pre-school programs (i.e. are not glorified baby sitting but have a curriculum); they excel in the PISA scores--without any question. I don't expect that you're an expert in data concerning education, but you should look into these PISA-OECD findings, and I hope you'll be surprised. Unless you are (and you seem to be) ideologically opposed to schooling in America, it is a major difference that separates us (US) from other nations (Finland, Korea, Canada, etc.) So get off your high horse of ideology and get with the facts: effective pre-school means big difference in international comparison. Don't care about such comparisons? Then don't expect us to accept your opinion

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MikeDavis

Mar-12-13 3:49 PM

Tom, again you miss my point. Today's urban primary schools are indoctrination centers more than education centers. I love education. When the taxpayer funded system gets back to teaching and not pushing the liberal agenda, I'll be a strong believer, and backer, in that system again. But after the countless instances of the education system caring more about the self esteem of the kids rather than the fact they can't do the basics of the three R's, why should I? The system is broken.

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Regelski

Mar-20-13 8:47 AM

Mike: If schools are preaching a liberal agenda, which is only your claim, what happened to you that you ended up exactly the opposite? Or are we supposed to pat you on the back for resisting? Schools are a "conserving" institution in our society; they conserve the best of the past as a basis for improving the future. As an institution, schooling changes more slowly than any other and teachers, by and large, are not revolutionaries: they're hardly in a place to make such waves, and most don't.

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