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CLCS OKs tuitioning contract

Ripley students in 7-12th grade will join school in the fallBy DAVE O’CONNOR CORRESPONDENT MAYVILLE — “Welcome Ripley,” was the way Chautauqua Lake Central School Board of Education member Jason Delcamp reacted when the board approved a contract with the

April 6, 2013

MAYVILLE — “Welcome Ripley,” was the way Chautauqua Lake Central School Board of Education member Jason Delcamp reacted when the board approved a contract with the Ripley Central School District at......

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(9)

THINKLONGTEREM

Apr-06-13 7:54 AM

good it is a step in the right direction now if westfield would get off of their high horse and merge with Brocton we may have some good school districts. ripley should be proud the kids will do great and clcs will become stronger

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225522

Apr-06-13 10:17 AM

No what you heard was: " Another nail being pounded in the coffin of far western NY small towns.

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THINKLONGTEREM

Apr-06-13 5:40 PM

that's BS we make western NY we make the towns

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commentor

Apr-06-13 6:12 PM

Can't see how this will save anything. Ripley school still open...same expenses. Did Ripley reduce staff...if not...still same expenses. Ripley is simply not facing reality. They must close.

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RipleyResident

Apr-06-13 7:16 PM

Ripley certainly did reduce staff. The overall effect projects to see a slight reduction in taxes the first year, and maybe more to follow, and the secondary school students will now have significantly more opportunities. And you know what? They did something, which is more than can be said for many other districts in worse shape.

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Captain

Apr-06-13 8:46 PM

We all know NYS has excessive taxes, which has led businesses & people to leave. This has also helped cause steady enrollment declines at many schools. We can't, however, ignore how/why public ED costs have gotten so far out of control. Ironically, but not surprisingly, public ED employees have contributed to the problems they now face.

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Chuck392

Apr-06-13 10:44 PM

Captain - I contend that businesses left, taking people with them or forcing them to move for other jobs. This in turn increased taxes. But, yes, now we sit here with high taxes which doesn't help attract much of anything.

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RipleyResident

Apr-06-13 11:22 PM

Employee costs are certainly a large part of the problem, but additionally NY State does to the school system what they do to everything else - implement unfunded mandates that the school districts must abide by. NY State law prevents schools from regionalizing at this point, as well.

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Captain

Apr-07-13 7:57 AM

I agree w/both of you (Chuck & RR), but again, employees & BOEs must accept blame, too, for their actions have contributed to the financial mess that most area school districts are in today.

Example: a few short years ago, CLCS union prez Judy Davenport initially demanded a 26% pay raise for CLCS teachers! I believe after a PERB ruling, the BOE & teachers agreed to 24%! To me, it wasn't the incredible pay raise that bothered me as much as it was the fact that Ms Davenport admitted she researched all property values in the district, and in her opinion, concluded the pay raise was NOT unreasonable???

IMO, this was greed, plain & simple.

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