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Keep water plans ‘going’

July 30, 2013

Fredonia may not be the only stick in the mud....

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(12)

PhilJulian

Aug-04-13 9:33 AM

HADENOUGH - you make some good points but sooner or later consolidation will happen because there is no other choice.

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hadenough

Aug-03-13 9:25 AM

Phil. The surrounding communities will never come together for a single purpose. Looking back one can see how the city has declined. The Waste Water plant was allowed to be run into the ground until a consent order was issued and look how much that cost the taxpayer and will for years in increased sewage fees, Same thing for the water Plant. The pump motors built in the 50's were never replaced. Why? Well other higher priority projects were taken care of first. One example that comes to mind is Memorial Park. The bike path is another. There was never any importance put on required fixes and upgrades. City monies spent on buying property. The surrounding communities read about this and say glad I don't live in the city. Until you can convince the surrounding communities there will never be consolidation with the city.

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concerned

Jul-31-13 9:20 PM

When the reservoir dries up again ( and it will ) we will see Fredonia having water pumped to them from Dunkirk again!

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jughead

Jul-31-13 1:01 PM

Good discussions all around - but a bit of misunderstanding about the City of Dunkirk Water Treatment Plant and other water treatment plants in the area. First, water towers can provide some storage during emergencies and power outages. However, their primary function is to increase the water pressure delivered to people's homes and businesses. The City's tanks range in size from 200,000 gallons to nearly two million gallons. Certainly not enough water stored to even make it through one full day with the City usage being around 4-5 million gallons per day. The elevated tanks primarily serve to raise pressure in the force mains by elevating the water and allowing gravity to do its thing - the further the water gets from the pumps at the plant the lower the pressure due to loss from pipe friction (and occasional leaks). And with regard to operating during a power outage, the Dunkirk facility has a standby generator - something other area plants likely do not have.

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Localone

Jul-30-13 6:21 PM

No kidding, but adequately sized towers provide a cushion for power outages and pump failures. Otherwise we'd have no need for them in the first place if we were to just rely on pumped volume.

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baseball

Jul-30-13 5:55 PM

Localone, water would needed to be pumped up-hill out of Dunkirk, and to get water in the Dunkirk towers, requires pumps!

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Localone

Jul-30-13 4:10 PM

Um... most communities including Dunkirk also have gravity feed. I think we call them water towers? And of course the cost in going to be in the millions, would you expect thousands? Be realistic for goodness sake. Its a fact that municipal water attracts business and communities need to spend money to make money. The problem here is we spend money on overpriced labor and duplication of services rather than growth and expansion. We're circling the bowl people and the longer we fight growth the faster the whirlpool gets.

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Christopher

Jul-30-13 10:47 AM

I'd dearly love to see a cost analysis of a regional water district. I'm told by those who know that the cost is in the MILLIONS of dollars. Where's that money going to come from? Baseball is absolutely correct on the plant ownership issue. If Dunkirk owns the plant they'll be able to make up budget shortfalls by "taxing" the other communities by raising water rates. And, I must point out that a regional district would be out of water during a power outage unless more money was spent on very large generators. Fredonia's system is gravity fed. Simplistic solutions are usually just that.

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Dcronlg

Jul-30-13 9:36 AM

Buffalo has SUNY at Buffalo and the state, private firms are pumping millions into the campus area, creating hundreds of jobs. SUNY-Albany is a hub for nanotechnology with private firms & the state pumping millions and creating hundreds of jobs.

Fredonia has SUNY. yet, you guys complain about the incubator...money always, always, always follows brains. If the northern area is to grow, you need to copy the other SUNYs and make SUNY Fredonia an economic hub. You can start first by not making all the other communities an albatross around Fredonia's neck.

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baseball

Jul-30-13 9:29 AM

Phil, the only way for a water district to work would be for Dunkirk to give up ownership of their water plant, fat chance of that happening. It would be Dunkirk that dictates the water rate if they still own the plant! I have no hatred towards Dunkirk, I have many family and friends that live and work there. I and many others just do not want to be at their mercy for water! As long as they own the plant, the politicians will use that to their advantage if they are the only water provider, they will use it as their cash cow to pay for the inept running of the City!

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PhilJulian

Jul-30-13 8:46 AM

We could nit-pik all day about the flaws in each community but the reality is that as a region we are failing miserably - we are all in this boat together and it is sinking. Northern Chautauqua County needs private sector investment and the availability of reliable, low cost water is critical for future development. So, set aside your bitterness and hatred for your neighboring community and come up with a plan that will help the whole region grow.

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Steiner

Jul-30-13 8:25 AM

We should not do anything to expand the use of great lakes water. we are running out of it, right judeye ? fracking and our population increase we see. the southwest, with all its deserts has far more water than we will ever have. we must preserve our water , for the children.

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