Sign In | Create an Account | Welcome, . My Account | Logout | Subscribe | Submit News | Extras | All Access e-Edition | Home RSS
 
 
 

Common Core topic at mini conference

October 20, 2013

By GAVIN PATERNITI Special to the OBSERVER Several Chautauqua County teachers underwent lessons of their own in order to better help themselves in the instruction of their student....

« Back to Article

 
 
sort: oldest | newest

Comments

(22)

shaver58

Oct-20-13 11:28 AM

anyone that knows anything about common core knows we should run it out of the country! Every one need to research what it's about and demand their school boards scrub it!

5 Agrees | 2 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

momof3kids

Oct-20-13 2:38 PM

Everyone needs to educate themselves on The Common Core. Once they learn what the common core is designed to do to education they will be appalled by the whole concept. There is a reason politicians have their own children in schools that are exempt from the common core. They all know that it is not in any way beneficial to learning. Children are being tested and assessed for THOUSANDS of hours each school year. Teachers are being forced to teach from a script rather than personalize any lessons for their classes. The lessons are beyond any reasonable level for the ages in which they are being taught. It's a method of "learning" that takes away any creative thinking for students. They are forced to think in one way and not to question "why" about anything. No room to negotiate a learning that will be exciting and engaging. The Common Core NEEDS TO GO!! People really need to be aware and concerned by what the government's common core is doing to education and ch

3 Agrees | 2 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

MoomaJ

Oct-20-13 3:57 PM

I am pretty shocked that a reading council thinks using these modules are a good way to teach children to read.

3 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

MoomaJ

Oct-20-13 4:04 PM

These modules Are not being used state wide. Many schools across the state are not implementing them. They were not piloted nor proven effective before they were adopted by many schools in Chautauqua County.

2 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

Momoftwins

Oct-20-13 5:19 PM

As an educator who is privileged enough to see a variety of teachers inspire children daily, I am perplexed by many of these comments. First, the modules are not a script. The plans have suggestions, but teacher judgement is always recommended. I observed a 3rd grade ELA module lesson for over an hour and not once did the teacher use a script in this classroom, I saw students begging to do the activity again and heard these 7 year old using vocabulary correctly that astounded me. MoomaJ is correct the modules are a model curriculum that individual districts may choose. They are, however being widely used in Chautauqua county. I am interested in what specifically momof3kids is opposed to... More importantly, we should celebrate the fact that 40 plus dedicated teachers chose to continue their learning on a Saturday....all in an effort to continuously do better for our students!!!

3 Agrees | 3 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

Momoftwins

Oct-20-13 5:19 PM

As an educator who is privileged enough to see a variety of teachers inspire children daily, I am perplexed by many of these comments. First, the modules are not a script. The plans have suggestions, but teacher judgement is always recommended. I observed a 3rd grade ELA module lesson for over an hour and not once did the teacher use a script in this classroom, I saw students begging to do the activity again and heard these 7 year old using vocabulary correctly that astounded me. MoomaJ is correct the modules are a model curriculum that individual districts may choose. They are, however being widely used in Chautauqua county. I am interested in what specifically momof3kids is opposed to... More importantly, we should celebrate the fact that 40 plus dedicated teachers chose to continue their learning on a Saturday....all in an effort to continuously do better for our students!!!

3 Agrees | 2 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

MoomaJ

Oct-20-13 5:35 PM

Momoftwins

they are written as a script and many districts are adhering to that and telling teachers not to adapt them. The primary grades are using developmentally inappropriate reading materials and some students have yet to hold a book in their hands! they are given typed excepts with vocabulary way beyond their reading levels.

1 Agrees | 2 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

momof3kids

Oct-20-13 5:49 PM

First, I applaud teaching and teachers. The fact that these teachers took time out of their Saturday to learn more is great. What I do not support in Common Core (to name just a few) 1. The one size fits all curriculum that it promotes. 2. The excessive assessments and testing that it requires. 3. The loss of individualism in the class. 4. Some of the lessons are not age appropriate or developmentally appropriate at the Elem level. 5. The early learning years will be rigid and rigorous; too much-too young! 6. The cost to our already financially strapped schools to implement the technology and materials needed for CC (all available from Pearson Publishing). 7. The teachers' effectiveness rating being linked to tests that are also not age or developmentally appropriate, raising the stakes even higher. 8. Lack of flexibility to offer lessons for gifted or struggling children (one size fits all) 9.Less fictional or classic lit, more informational text. 10. Lessening of creative writing.

4 Agrees | 2 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

momof3kids

Oct-20-13 5:55 PM

The modules are absolutely a form of scripted teaching that teachers are encouraged to follow. Linking money to test scores will never result in a positive learning atmosphere. Teachers will ultimately teach to the test so that it looks like their effective, when in actuality they are already effective when they engage children in learning.

2 Agrees | 2 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

Momoftwins

Oct-20-13 6:37 PM

Momof3kids, thank you for being a concerned parent! Dialogue is necessary in this process. As a standards based state, and alignment has been part of education for over 2 decades. If the districts are telling teachers to read the lessons then tat is a district issue, not a common core issue. Standardized tests are not new! My boys who just graduated we're tested MORE in elementary than students are now, the state removed the history assessment. Standardized testing accounts for .08% of a students time in school. Any further formative or summation assessments are at the discretion of the teacher. EVERY lesson within the modules offers suggestions for differentiation of instruction for both gifted and struggling learners. I'm not sure what you ate referring to as inappropriate for grade 5, however students I hear students on a daily basis quoting the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and will have a better understanding of human struggle when they read "Esperanza Rising&q

3 Agrees | 3 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

Momoftwins

Oct-20-13 6:42 PM

And finally, to address your point on classical literature, had my own children experienced the modules, they would have read "To Kill a Mockingbird" an injustice to their education that they didn't. The point of the CC is to balance literature and informational text.

1 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

Momoftwins

Oct-20-13 6:47 PM

And finally, textbook aid can now be used (not in years prior) to purchase curriculum materials from Core Knowledge, Expeditionary Learning and Public Consulting Group. Pearson is the assessment company. Respectfully...

1 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

MoomaJ

Oct-20-13 7:27 PM

Momof twins You say every lesson is differentiated for gifted and special Ed? I totally disagree with that statement. I work in an elementary school. One of our complaints is the one size fits all model. The material is not engaging to students and children who used to love reading are now very much disliking their reading classes.

Parents are also voicing their discontent. The vocabulary and the concepts are not appropriate for primary children..

2 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

Momoftwins

Oct-20-13 7:31 PM

Grades 3-8, left hand column gives advice for differentiation, however every teacher knows how to meet the needs of students and should.

1 Agrees | 2 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

momof3kids

Oct-20-13 7:40 PM

I also must respectfully disagree with your statement that the curriculum offers flexibility for gifted or struggling learners. Testing (assessments and pretest preparation included) consisted of over 3,000 hours of student time last year alone. That is not, under any circumstance, acceptable. Children were sitting in silence for 3-4 hours/day in 3-4 day stretches for the standardized testing. No child age 8-12 should be sitting for that long for any test. Especially when the dialogue of the testing was nearly 2 grade levels above their appropriate learning level. The common core does not have the best interest of children or learning at it's "core". When I referred to the age appropriateness, it was not for grade 5- I was moving on to my #5 reason for why the CC is not beneficial to students OR learning. I should also point out that the modules at the high school level are not as age inappropriate as they are at the elementary level. Middle and Elementary students are l

1 Agrees | 2 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

momof3kids

Oct-20-13 7:53 PM

MomofTwins: You asked me why I was so strongly opposed to Common Core. So, tell us (those who oppose) why you support it so strongly. You obviously have older children and perhaps are an administrator or teacher at an older level. Do you have elementary or middle school age children who are feeling the more negative effects of Common Core? Testing has been around for as long as I can remember. The new outline for NYS standardized testing is what I have an issue with. It takes up way too much time from real learning for students. Too much emphasis and pressure is placed on the outcome of the tests and the teachers are having to "teach to the test" because their effectiveness as an educator are linked to the scores rather than what they do in their classroom the rest of the year. That is a recipe for disaster! Children need to be tested on their knowledge, but not in the manner that the Common Core requires.

2 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

Momoftwins

Oct-20-13 8:03 PM

A student is only in school for 1472 hours maximum per year and the grades most tested sit for a maximum of 12 hours for a summative assessment (grades 4 and8). Teachers can and should use predictive data in lieu of a per assessment. All other assessments are at the discretion of the teacher, thus .08% of a students year is spent testing

1 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

Ratherbesurfingagain

Oct-20-13 8:27 PM

Momof3kids, I am not sure you know the difference between the common core & the modules. Your statement "teachers are being forced to teach from a script" I assume is meant to reference the modules, not the common core standards since they are standards not a curriculum.

Your statement " they are forced to think in one ways and not to question why about anything" also confuses me since reading standard 8 states" Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims" which sounds like back up any claim you have.

Have you read the standards ?

1 Agrees | 2 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

momof3kids

Oct-20-13 8:27 PM

I do apologize (my phone likes to auto-correct me) over 300 hours/year. Still not an acceptable amount of learning time spent on testing. What is the reasoning you support CC so strongly? Also, you mentioned that you observed a 3rd grade classroom, that would lead me to believe you are an administrator. Do you have elementary and middle school students in public school? As an informed parent who strongly opposes CC and it's intentions, tell me something positive that I may not know. How can parents begin to view CC as something that is beneficial and positive for our children? I have children on both ends of the spectrum. One who struggles and one who excels easily. They are both losing out on the one size fits all curriculum that the CC is forcing on them.

1 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

judeye

Oct-21-13 7:23 AM

"The Common Core State Standards provide a consistent, clear understanding of what students are expected to learn, so teachers and parents know what they need to do to help them."

There is NO mandate on the CC. NY state choose to adopt the standards which were made up by a huge committee, including teachers, in attempt to raise the standards of what our children learn in school.

I just looked over the standards for third grade (grade my grandson is in). I did not see anything that was not age appropriate or too difficult.

I saw standards that could be taught anyway as long as the end result was obtained. Is that not true? Am I missing something?

0 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

momof3kids

Oct-21-13 9:43 AM

Judeye- That is the "mission statement" of Common Core, but that barely scrapes the surface of what the CC entails. Look deeper. Also, it was mentioned that I oppose the modules moreso than the Common Core. If you read the engageny website it lists the modules to coincide with the common core lessons. They are essentially hand in hand and you can't support or oppose one without the other. The Common Core was never field tested before it was implemented in our schools and our children are paying the price for the lack of research done. They are the guinea pigs in some ways. Common Core also relies heavily on data driven instruction, rather than viewing children and their learning styles individually. It's all a game of numbers. Children are not common, not one child is like another and data instruction is not beneficial to their education. I beg of people to learn more and dig deeper than what the surface tells you.

1 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

judeye

Oct-21-13 6:23 PM

I guess I still am confused.

These are only standards, saying that our children should know how to do so and so at the end of this year. I looked at the modules for reading grade 3 and although he has not read those books, he is working on learning the skills in this core area.

What do you mean field testing, when it is only a set of standards? Gosh I hope they put in able to write a check and balance a checkbook, fill out a job application, and soft skills for jobs (go to work on time, etc) as well as all the academic ones.

How would YOU suggest we start to set standards of what our children should be learning in each year?

There are standards even for babies..by such and such age they should be able to turn over, look at an object for so long, etc. How is this different?

Modules are suggestions are they not for teaching the skills that the child should obtain by the end of the year. If someone has a better way of teaching the same skill, are they permitted to use

0 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

Showing 22 of 22 comments
 
 

Post a Comment

You must first login before you can comment.

*Your email address:
*Password:
Remember my email address.
or
 
 

 

I am looking for:
in:
News, Blogs & Events Web