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‘Failures’: ‘Wait list’ wrongs many

July 2, 2014

“Significant and chronic system failures” have occurred at the Department of Veterans Affairs, according to a just-concluded White House investigation....

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joew

Jul-07-14 9:42 PM

This is what you said paulie- It's the ONLY example, and one I addressed as perhaps the only reason to provide clinics like Dunkirk, and have said so many times. "One" is not "many. Are we now changing the criteria paulie? How about SCI and TBI units? Have any idea what those would cost to incorporate into local or regional hospitals? How many local and regional hospitals have extensive prosthetic rehab programs paulie? Go ahead,change the criteria yet again that you set forth.

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Christopher

Jul-07-14 12:16 PM

Description: Gulf War Syndrome

"Between 1994 and 1999, 145 federally funded research studies on Gulf War-related illnesses were undertaken at a cost of over $133 million. Despite this investment and the data collected from over 100,000 veterans who have registered with the Department of Defense (DOD) and/or Veterans Administration (VA) as having Gulf War-related illnesses, there is still much debate over the origin and nature of Gulf War syndrome. As of early 2001, the DOD has failed to establish a definite cause for the disorder. Veterans who have the illness experience a wide range of debilitating symptoms that elude a single diagnosis. Common symptoms include fatigue, trouble breathing, headaches, disturbed sleep, memory loss, and lack of concentration. Similar experiences among Gulf War veterans have been reported in the United Kingdom and Canada."

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Christopher

Jul-07-14 11:46 AM

By the way, Gulf War Syndrome is even easier to determine than Agent Orange issues, the symptoms are much more cohesive, but the VA has yet to actually acknowledge it's existence, much like AO issues. You'll notice there is a LONG list of AO associated diseases which the VA will pay for, yet won't actually admit to AO being the cause. If they did, lawsuits could be filed against various large and powerful companies, perhaps even the government. However, that's not the issue, the issue is whether the VA as currently played out needs to exist, and it doesn't.

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Christopher

Jul-07-14 11:41 AM

Ok, let's see what we can do to clarify things for you, Joey. What services are delivered that can't be delivered cheaper by private hospitals if a need and most importantly, PAYMENT for this needs are delivered? The large majority of the services provided at VA hospitals ARE available in almost any hospital. I include dental and eyeglasses, hearing aides and such in the mix, as well as foot care. Add Heart and stroke, various surgeries, all available elsewhere. But you of course have an agenda to misrepresent everything and anything I say by providing small EXCEPTIONS to justify one of the largest and most expensive bureaucracies in the nation. You're not educating anyone, you're obfuscating. Typical.

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joew

Jul-06-14 9:54 AM

No it is not the only example. There are many specialized units within the VA that are not available locally or even regionally. Name for me a hospital even in Buffalo that has a Gulf War Syndrome" treatment program. As I said paulie,do some research. I don't intend to sit here all day and educate people.

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Christopher

Jul-06-14 8:38 AM

It's the ONLY example, and one I addressed as perhaps the only reason to provide clinics like Dunkirk, and have said so many times. "One" is not "many".

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joew

Jul-06-14 8:36 AM

research.

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joew

Jul-06-14 8:34 AM

Day Hospital PTSD Programs include two basic approaches to providing a "therapeutic community" that veterans with PTSD can attend several times weekly for social, recreational, and vocational activities as well as for counseling. Day Treatment PTSD Units provide one-to-one case management and counseling, and group therapy, education, and activities, in order to help clients live successfully with PTSD. Treatment and socialization activities are scheduled on a several-hour-a-day basis during the day and evening hours. Residential (Lodger) PTSD Units also offer one-to-one case management and counseling, and group therapy, education, and activities, on a several-hour-a-day basis. While enrolled in daytime and evening PTSD treatment, lodger clients may live temporarily in secure quarters that do not have 24-hour nursing supervision. That is just one example,for many more that local hospitals do not and can not provide without substantial investments and costs,do some res

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Christopher

Jul-05-14 9:28 PM

"Phil something I failed to mention is the enormous expenses local hospitals would incur in order to offer the specialized treatments for Veterans that only the VA can now provide." Such as?

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joew

Jul-05-14 8:28 PM

Phil something I failed to mention is the enormous expenses local hospitals would incur in order to offer the specialized treatments for Veterans that only the VA can now provide.

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Christopher

Jul-05-14 7:46 PM

By the way, I AM aware that Medicaid costs more than the VA system, but it serves a LOT more people. No comparison per patient.

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Christopher

Jul-05-14 7:43 PM

"The President’s 2015 Budget includes $163.9 billion for VA in 2015. This includes $68.3 billion in discretionary resources and $95.6 billion in mandatory funding. Our discretionary budget request represents an increase of $2.0 billion, or 3.0 percent, over the 2014 enacted level." Now then, if you can't see that as an extraordinary expensive system, I just don't know what to say to you. But by golly those poor people are sure eating up a LOT of our money!!!

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Christopher

Jul-05-14 7:30 PM

Joey, your last post absolutely proves my point that the VA system is too large and too unwieldy for anyone to control, let alone our useless bought and paid for Congress. I agree ANYONE using the Dunkirk Clinic would be happy. Unfortunately those small clinics can't provide services of a more serious nature. We were talking about VA Hospitals, weren't we? But of course, you insist on changing the subject when it suits you, like always. The expenditures you listed above are absolute proof of what Phil posted. There will always be serious scandals and wasted money, LOTS of wasted money, in any system that large. The only expense of a voucher system is services provided and processing, not one penny more. Funny about what spending some like and what they don't, what tax money is a waste and what isn't.

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joew

Jul-05-14 9:33 AM

Phil the VA's budget last fiscal year included over 4 billion for just that. Tom Reed has introduced a bill(co-sponsored) to expand that program. VA carried over $1.449 billion in medical-care funding from fiscal year 2010 to 2011, $1.163 billion from fiscal year 2011 to fiscal year 2012, $637 million from fiscal year 2012 to 2013, and $543 million from fiscal year 2013 to 2014. The wind turbine at the St. Cloud VA facility that cost 2.3 million still does not work after almost 4 years. Two other VA facilities are installing solar panels to the tune of 5 Million each which will provide only 10% of their power needs. That money should have been used to reduce the wait time.

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PhilJulian

Jul-05-14 8:42 AM

I don't understand why vets can't be issued vouchers to get care at private hospitals. It sure beats dying (usually). Anytime government gets involved with a service it's going to be costly and it's going to be inefficient.

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ProudToBeUnAmerican

Jul-05-14 6:38 AM

We wouldn't be in this mess if the Democrats had been stronger when the GOP blocked efforts to fund the VA. Every time the GOP filibustered the Democrats rolled over like whipped dogs - they should be ashamed!

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joew

Jul-04-14 3:42 PM

and (D)things.

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joew

Jul-04-14 3:41 PM

I have posted "the rest of the story" that is backed up by facts and surveys of vets. All is not doom and gloom,there are bright spots and I did so without mentioning names or by using the little (R) things which would have been very easy I might add. Happy birthday America!!!!!!!

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joew

Jul-04-14 2:38 PM

As I said the VA system is not perfect,and the deaths of Vets waiting for care is appalling however the facts speak for themselves,vets rate the system the same as or better than private sector facilities. Those are facts,not conjecture! There are many Vets who go to VA facilities who could as well use private facilities because they like the care they receive. That is as well part of the the survey. I don't know of any Vets who have been polled either,I must assume that someone posting here speaks for all Vets right? I'll bet that if anyone was to stop down to the Dunkirk facility,or Jamestown,or Olean you would hear nothing but good remarks. There are many more facilities just as good as those I mentioned.

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Christopher

Jul-04-14 11:23 AM

And, many of those vets are totally dependent on the VA, have no experience with any other system, and whether they like it or not, it has nothing to do with the expense of it, and the totally unacceptable and onerous system for filing claims to get into the system, nor does it excuse the sometimes horrible events and care that is received. It also doesn't address the expense nor inconvenience for travel, nor do I believe is that issue addressed in the poll. You notice the qualifier, "once they get into the system". The issue of healthcare in this country in general is bad, but worse for veterans as it's all they have.

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joew

Jul-04-14 11:04 AM

I am not a expert nor do i speak for all Veterans(as alleged) and I might add neither does anyone else because they belong to a couple of websites. Research is the key and as I have said the VA system while not perfect has many good facilities and our Vets rate them highly!

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Christopher

Jul-04-14 8:42 AM

Again, many, even the majority, of these veterans have no options not experiences with any other system. I also don't know one single veteran that has ever been polled on his opinions. Amazing. And, adding that private hospitals also have issues has nothing to do with the inconvenience and expense of the VA system. BILLIONS of wasted money that could be replaced by vouchers, not only better for the veterans but adding to the revenue of and maybe keeping a lot of small hospitals like Brooks and Lakeshore viable, good for everybody.

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joew

Jul-04-14 8:16 AM

In 2013, the overall ACSI satisfaction index for VA was 84 for inpatient care and 82 for outpatient care, which compares favorably with the U.S. hospital industry (scores of 80 and 83, respectively). Since 2004, the ACSI survey has consistently shown that Veterans give VA hospitals and clinics a higher customer satisfaction score, on average, than patients give private sector hospitals. These overall scores are based on specific feedback on customer expectations, perceived value and quality, responsiveness to customer complaints, and customer loyalty. One signature finding for 2013 is the continuing high degree of loyalty to VA among Veterans, with a score of 93 percent favorable. This score has remained high (above 90 percent) for the past ten years. There are two sides to everything,all is not doom and gloom as some would have people believe.

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joew

Jul-04-14 8:10 AM

Reports have emerged that a man died in a hospital waiting room in New York City more than eight hours after he sought emergency care. According to multiple reports, 30-year-old John Verrier entered the emergency room of St. Barnabas Hospital in the Bronx at around 10 p.m. on Jan. 12 complaining about a rash. He was found dead in the waiting room about 6:40 a.m. the next day when a guard failed to wake him up. Tragic that it happens but it does even in private hospitals.

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Christopher

Jul-04-14 7:59 AM

I might add, most vets using the VA system have no alternative, so their opinions are often based on "better than nothing".

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